IFRC


In-pictures: Six months after the Nepal earthquake

Six months after two terrible earthquakes rocked Nepal, disrupting the lives of 5.6 million people, the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies and the Nepal Red Cross Society have completed a massive emergency response operation that reached more than 620,000 people.

 

On 25 April 2015, the lives of hundreds of thousands of people in Nepal were transformed by the worst earthquake the country has experienced since 1934. A total of 5.6 million people were affected by the two earthquakes; 8,857 people were killed and more than 900,000 houses were damaged or destroyed. Poul Henning Nielsen/Danish Red Cross

 

Six months after the Nepal earthquake, many families are living next to their damaged or destroyed houses in temporary shelter.  Pierre Grandidier / IFRC

 

People use Red Cross tarpaulins to build temporary shelters next to their damaged houses in near Mangaltar Village, Kavre district. Pierre Grandidier / IFRC

 

To support rebuilding, the Red Cross is training builders, masons and community members in methods to construct more earthquake-resistant houses. This will help people rebuild their own houses in a safer way and it also gives them marketable skills in the mammoth rebuilding effort. Bishnu Kalpit / IFRC




Following the April 25 earthquake in Nepal, the Nepal Red Cross and Danish Red Cross distributed self-recovery shelter kits to 2,000 earthquake affected households in Lamjung district to help them establish temporary homes. Poul Henning Nielsen/Danish Red Cros

 

The shelter kits included corrugated galvanised iron (CGI) sheets, toolkits, kitchen sets and blankets.  Poul Henning Nielsen/Danish Red Cross

 

Following the April 25 earthquake in Nepal, cash grants of 15,000 rupees were distributed to 2,000 earthquake affected households in Tanahun district by Nepal Red Cross, Danish Red Cross and the British Red Cross. Poul Henning Nielsen/Danish Red Cross

 

Cash distributions enabled people to buy what they needed most to help them recover after the earthquake. Cash is an important tool for recovery, giving people the dignity of making their own decisions in prioritising their own recovery needs. Poul Henning Nielsen/Danish Red Cross





The IFRC launched an 85 million Swiss franc (USD 88 million/78 million euro) emergency appeal to help the Nepal Red Cross Society deliver emergency relief to earthquake survivors and support longer-term recovery of affected communities. Poul Henning Nielsen/Danish Red Cross


The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) is the world's largest humanitarian organization, with 190 member National Societies. As part of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement, our work is guided by seven fundamental principles; humanity, impartiality, neutrality, independence, voluntary service, unity and universality. About this site & copyright