IFRC

Diseases

HIV

HIV

HIV continues to thrive amid inequality and disparity. Achieving equitable access to treatment for key populations at higher risk of HIV remains an unmet challenge of the global HIV response. In 2012, around 9.7 million people had access to the lifesaving treatment, representing only one-third of those eligible. Access to testing and lack of knowledge of one’s HIV status are the biggest barrier...

Malaria

Malaria - success through partnership

The IFRC has been successful in preventing and treating malaria around the globe and in scaling up its anti-malaria activities in partnership with other organizations.

Measles

Measles

Measles is one of the most contagious diseases in children. It killed more than 1 million children in 1999. The IFRC supports and celebrates the Measles Initiative, which has vaccinated over 600 million children in more than 60 countries since 2001.

Noncommunicable diseases

Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) are usually caused by genetic or lifestyle factors. Four types of NCDs – cardiovascular diseases, cancers, diabetes and chronic respiratory diseases – account for almost two-thirds of all deaths globally, with 80 per cent of these occurring in low- and middle-income countries.  Response The IFRC is improving NCD prevention, detection and treatment through...

Pandemic influenza

Pandemic influenza

Pandemic influenza is caused by a new strain of flu virus that people have had no previous exposure to. It is therefore likely to infect many more people and cause complications in otherwise healthy individuals.

Towards a polio-free Africa

The eradication of wildpolio virus remains one of the most pressing health challenges in Africa. The continent witnessed the majority of global polio cases in 2013, and is home to one of the three last countries in the world where polio is still endemic, Nigeria. Polio is highly contagious and one of the most difficult diseases to eradicate. About 90 per cent of all children in any given...



The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) is the world's largest humanitarian organization, with 190 member National Societies. As part of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement, our work is guided by seven fundamental principles; humanity, impartiality, neutrality, independence, voluntary service, unity and universality. About this site & copyright