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Earthquake hits West Java, Indonesia as authorities rush to rescue survivors

22/11/2022 | Press release

Jakarta / Kuala Lumpur, 22 November 2022: Thousands of families in the west of the island Java were left reeling as a 5.6 magnitude earthquake hit the area on the afternoon on Monday, 21 November. Thousands of houses, schools, infrastructure, roads and more have been severely damaged as some are seen in a state of rubble. The National Agency for Disaster Countermeasure in Indonesia officially reports more than 103 casualties and more than 320 people injured. The numbers are still emerging as the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC), and Indonesian Red Cross (Palang Merah) are working with authorities to urgently assess ground situation and gather more information. The Secretary General of Indonesian Red Cross, Sudirman Said, said: “We are devastated to hear about the lives that have been lost by the earthquake. Indonesian Red Cross relief and emergency teams have been deployed to help with evacuations, providing first aid, distribute clean water, establish emergency kitchens and emergency relief, focusing on most affected areas. We also mobilised 5 units of ambulance, medical personnel and volunteers to help with urgent evacuation and ground assessment. “We are doing all we can to ensure no more lives are lost. We are ensuring that our volunteers and personnel do all they can to help people seek safety and comfort at our emergency shelters where critical relief can be found. We would also urge people to stay calm and to contact authorities for help.” The earthquake hit the district of Cianjur where the livelihoods of the people thrive around small and medium enterprises revolving around local wear and products. While the earthquake did not trigger tsunami warnings, the people of West Java are no stranger to earthquakes and are doing all they can to stay vigilant for aftershocks and dangerous falling debris. Over 13,700 people have been reported displaced while thousands more have lost their homes and are scattered in various emergency shelters. IFRC Head of Delegation, Indonesia, Elkhan Rahimov, said: “We are alongside Indonesian Red Cross to closely assess ground situation and determine the immediate needs of the affected community. Volunteers at the frontline are also prioritizing the safety and wellbeing of themselves as they work around the clock to help people get to safety. “Our first main priority is to serve the affected community by meeting their immediate needs like access to drinking water, shelter and administering first aid. We are focusing our efforts on these while we plan our next phase of longer-term assistance.” Red Cross personnel continue to respond as landslides, electricity and telecommunications cut off are reported. For more information or to arrange an interview, contact: In Kuala Lumpur: Rachel Punitha, +60 19 791 3830, [email protected] In Jakarta: Annisa Marezqa, +62 812-8103-9155, [email protected] Awan Diga Aristo, +62 813-2063-5505, [email protected]

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22/11/2022
Earthquake hits West Java, Indonesia as authorities rush to rescue survivors
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Earthquake hits West Java, Indonesia as authorities rush to rescue survivors
22/11/2022 | Press release
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COP27: Now is the time to transform words into action

20/11/2022 | Press release

In response to the Sharm El-Sheikh Implementation Plan, a statement by President Francesco Rocca and Secretary General Jagan Chapagain of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC): While leaders have been meeting at COP27 for the past two weeks, families are dealing with the very real impacts of extreme weather—unable to wait for promises to transform into action.  Over the past two weeks, the IFRC’s risk watch system put out alerts for some 14 floods in Africa, 18 in the Americas, 35 in Asia Pacific, five in the European Union and two in the MENA region. During this period, four named tropical storms threatened destruction. Wildfires have ripped through communities in ten countries, affecting more than 10,000 hectares. And on Friday, at least three people died as the result of floods in Kigali, Rwanda and 11 in Venezuela. In Ethiopia 185,000 people were displaced. Communities in Africa and Afghanistan continue to grapple with food insecurity, which are alarming compounding crises. Loss and Damage landed on the COP agenda for the first time, and today world leaders have agreed to the establishment of new funding arrangements assisting developing nations, especially those most at-risk of the adverse effects of climate change. We welcome the finance pledges which have been made on Loss and Damage, which are historically important conversations and positive steps forward. These need to be complemented by new and additional finance that reaches the people and communities most at risk – and to be predictable, adequate, and flexible in order to address climate related crisis. We are pleased to see the agreement to operationalize the Santiago Network on Loss and Damage to provide crucial technical assistance to reduce and respond to the impacts communities are already facing. However, we must raise our ambition to reduce emissions and this COP did not deliver on that front. Every increment of global warming matters to save lives and livelihoods, and is therefore critical to keep global temperatures below the 1.5C degrees warming limit.  We welcome the focus on Early Warning Systems in the Sharm El-Sheikh Implementation Plan, which reflects realities at the frontlines of the climate crisis that the IFRC has been bringing to the fore for over two decades. Reducing risk and saving lives, especially in last mile communities, is what our teams around the globe do every single day and it is heartening to see this work being expanded. To be most effective, early warnings must be followed by early action and these systems must be rooted in the communities—including those hardest to reach and families stuck in protracted crises. As the humanitarian impacts of climate change keep growing, so too should the finance for adaptation, ensuring it reaches the most affected and most at-risk. As the legacy of the “implementation COP,” global investment needs to reach the local level.  It is time to turn words and commitments into action at the national level, to bring the agreement to life and make a real difference in the lives of people and communities most impacted by the climate crisis.  As the IFRC network, we are committed to scaling up local action to respond to the climate crisis, working with communities to build preparedness and resilience in face of rising risks and impacts. Climate and environmental crises are a threat to humanity and we all have a role to play. Now we must look forward with focused determination and hope.  Our collective actions can inspire ambition we need to see in the world. Media contacts: In Geneva: Anna Tuson, +41 79 895 6924, [email protected]

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20/11/2022
COP27: Now is the time to transform words into action
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COP27: Now is the time to transform words into action
20/11/2022 | Press release
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COP27: Negotiations are missing the ambition needed to protect those hardest hit by climate change, warns IFRC

15/11/2022 | Press release

The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) is raising concern that progress is stalling at COP27 and that there is a risk that the ambition to deliver and build on commitments made in Glasgow is slipping away. With just a few days left for leaders to take decisive action on climate change, commitments to make steep and immediate emission reductions to stay below the 1.5oC warming limit—and thus limit further human suffering—are falling behind. And while negotiators are grappling with issues designed to limit and respond to the rising human impacts of climate change, technical discussions on delivering new and additional finance for loss and damage, as well as adaptation, are progressing too slowly to meet the needs of people. Instead, the IFRC calls on Parties to build on what was agreed in Glasgow and raise ambition and action on mitigation, adaptation and on loss and damage. “Combating the climate crisis and its effects takes bold thinking and even more ambitious action. World leaders cannot afford downgrading, but must raise their level of ambition to tackle the climate crisis, which is already dangerous for communities around the globe,” said Francesco Rocca, President of the IFRC. “Letting up on ambitious goals sends a clear signal back to countries that meeting their previous commitments is optional. This is unacceptable. Communities—especially those most impacted by climate change—need promises that deliver with new and additional support to meet the scale of needs,” remarked Jagan Chapagain, Secretary General of the IFRC. This is the critical decade for action. The world cannot afford to stall or backtrack on lifesaving commitments. There is no time to delay. Already at 1.1oC warming, IFRC found that 86% of all disasters in the last decade are linked to climate and weather extremes, affecting 1.7 billion people. This is an increase of almost 35% since the 1990s. Communities are being repeatedly hit by extreme events - such as Kenya, which faced floods then locusts and now a drought triggering food insecurity and leading to malnutrition and death across the horn of Africa. “We must invest in local action. Without it, we will still be saying the same things at COP28,” reiterated Dr. Asha Mohammed, Secretary General of the Kenya Red Cross. If we are to ever meet the needs of communities suffering these multiple repeated and overlapping events, it is essential to invest in ambitious mitigation, to scale up locally led adaptation and address losses and damages. Parties must respond to the growing demands for finance to reach the local level, reaching communities at the scale needed. These requests must be heard and translated into meaningful decision text. Recent IFRC research demonstrates that many countries and communities are getting left behind when it comes to investment in climate adaptation. Existing funding is not enough to meet current needs, let alone the increased humanitarian impacts of more frequent and intense extreme weather and climate events. According to Maarten van Aalst, Director of the Red Cross Red Crescent Climate Centre, COP27 needs to deliver on three fronts: tangible progress on mobilizing new and additional funding to address loss and damage; more finance for climate adaptation; and increased ambition to implement rapid emission reductions to keep hopes of limiting warming to 1.5C alive. To request an interview or for more information, please contact: In Sharm El-Sheikh:Jenelle Eli, +1 202 603 6803, [email protected] In Washington: Marie Claudet, +1 202 999 8689, [email protected]

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15/11/2022
COP27: Negotiations are missing the ambition needed to protect those hardest hit by climate change, warns IFRC
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COP27: Negotiations are missing the ambition needed to protect those hardest hit by climate change, warns IFRC
15/11/2022 | Press release
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IFRC launches Global Climate Resilience Platform to support 500 million people on climate crisis frontlines

09/11/2022 | Press release

Geneva, 9 November 2022 – As COP27 gets underway what’s most urgently needed is clear: accelerated investment in communities on the frontlines of the climate crisis. At a make-or-break moment, the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) is launching today its Global Climate Resilience Platform to increase the resilience of communities most vulnerable to the changing climate. The new initiative aims to support 500 million people by raising at least CHF1 billion through a five-year global initiative focusing on early warning and anticipatory action, nature-based solutions, and safety nets and shock responsive social protection. Secretary General of the IFRC, Jagan Chapagain, says:   “We've launched the Global Climate Resilience Platform to create transformational change through an immense scale up of investment at the local community level, heeding the call for faster and broader efforts to address the climate crisis.    “Real sustainable change can only happen when the people impacted are driving decisions.  Funding local climate action without having to go through multiple layers is crucial if we are to be truly successful in building resilience from the ground up.”  Through the platform, the IFRC network will support meaningful participation and the active leadership of women, local communities, Indigenous peoples, youth and other marginalised and/or underrepresented groups in the development and implementation of locally led climate action in 100 countries most vulnerable to climate change. President of the IFRC, Francesco Rocca, says: "The critical challenge of this decade is how to support and finance climate resilience initiatives at a global scale. The key is found in the shift of power and resources to local actors.” IFRC’s Making it Count: Smart Climate Financing for the Most Vulnerable People report has found that many highly vulnerable countries are not receiving the climate adaptation support they need and are being left behind. On average, they received less than a quarter of the adaptation funding per person that went to low or very low vulnerability countries. In addition, only an estimated 10% of funding is granted at the local level as donors instead favour large-scale national infrastructure projects that risk missing the mark for local communities. Under Secretary General of the IFRC, Nena Stoiljkovic, said the platform focused on the key areas that had been identified as having the most potential for transformative impact at scale through increased investment and were expected to generate multiple dividends, including—first and foremost—saving lives. She noted that the initiative will link sources of funding across humanitarian, development and climate funds as well as innovative financing mechanisms involving the private sector to meet its ambitious but critical targets. Increased resilience also stimulates sustainable development and innovation and is a more efficient focus in humanitarian response: investing one dollar in climate resilience in communities can save six dollars of investments in disaster response. Media contacts: In Geneva: Anna Tuson, +41 79 895 6924, [email protected] In Washington: Marie Claudet, +1 202 999 8689, [email protected]

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09/11/2022
IFRC launches Global Climate Resilience Platform to support 500 million people on climate crisis frontlines
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IFRC launches Global Climate Resilience Platform to support 500 million people on climate crisis frontlines
09/11/2022 | Press release
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DREF Pledging Conference 2022: Donors united to pledge increased support to local humanitarian action

04/11/2022 | Article

Climate-related disasters are occurring with increasing frequency and intensity. But the vast majority do not make international headlines—devastating lives, infrastructure and economies without attention, resources or help for those affected. At the IFRC, we know that the global-to-local funding model is the most effective and cost-efficient way to get aid to where it’s needed the most, both in anticipation of disasters and immediately after they strike. This is exactly why we set up our Disaster Response Emergency Fund in 1985: to get funding quickly to local Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies who can support communities in crisis around the world like no other. Since its launch, the DREF has funded thousands of emergency responses worldwide and supported more than 210 million people. And this year, the DREF has evolved to provide even more agility, flexibility and resources to National Societies. Watch the following video to learn about some of the lesser-known crises the DREF has supported in 2022. But donations to this vital fund are not keeping pace with the growing number of climate-induced disasters and increasing humanitarian needs. "Given the need to respond to compounded and frequent humanitarian crises, our collective ambition should be to grow DREF to be able to address these increasing needs" Jagan Chapagain IFRC Secretary General The DREF Pledging Conference 2022 therefore sought to grow the DREF to 100 million Swiss francs per year to address this funding gap—making sure that silent disasters are met with loud responses. To support this aim, we were delighted to receive pledges at the conference from the following governments: Australia Canada Czech Republic France Germany Ireland Netherlands Norway Luxembourg People's Republic of China Sweden Switzerland Thailand United Kingdom United States of America In addition, we also received valuable pledges from the European Union (EU) and, from the private sector, the companies Splunk and White & Case. This year’s conference also showcased an innovative insurance-based finance mechanism we’ve developed for the DREF in partnership with Aon and the Centre for Disaster Protection (CDP). The insurance mechanism aims to leverage donor contributions to attract private capital and ultimately increase the fund’s capacity in times of increased need. Watch the below video and read this recent opinion piece in Fortune magazine to find out more. Now more than ever, communities on the frontlines of climate change—and in many other emergency settings—need fast and effective local assistance to prepare for, and respond to, crises. It is urgent that the DREF can keep pace and help Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies be there for communities when they are needed the most. We are deeply grateful for the involvement of all existing and new donors who participated in the DREF Pledging Conference 2022. For more information about the DREF or the 2022 pledging conference: Visit this page on our website. Read this Twitter thread to see how the conference unfolded. Download our DREF Annual Plan 2022 and DREF Strategic Ambition 2021-2025. Or you can contact: Florent Del Pinto (Manager, Emergency Operations Centre) [email protected] Ivana Mrdja (Manager, National Society and Government Partners) [email protected]

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04/11/2022
DREF Pledging Conference 2022: Donors united to pledge increased support to local humanitarian action
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DREF Pledging Conference 2022: Donors united to pledge increased support to local humanitarian action
04/11/2022 | Article
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