The IFRC was created to bring kindness – and kindness is needed more than ever

 A volunteer hugs a woman affected by the conflict in Ukraine and reassures her she will receive help and assistance from the Ukrainian Red Cross.

A volunteer hugs a woman affected by the conflict in Ukraine and reassures her she will receive help and assistance from the Ukrainian Red Cross for however long she needs.

Photo: Ukrainian Red Cross

A message from the IFRC Secretary General, Jagan Chapagain, ahead of World Red Cross and Red Crescent Day this Sunday 8th May.

“The world is bleeding, and it needs help now”.

Stark words of warning from a humanitarian leader shaken by a brutal war and living under the shadow of a global pandemic.

I did not pen these words. They were written in 1919, by Henry Davison, the leader of the American Red Cross.

His big idea was that the world’s Red Cross societies – which were set up after the movement was created by Nobel Laureate Henry Dunant in 1863 – should come together as a force for good at all times, and not only during wars. Davison firmly believed the kindness and expertise shown by Red Cross volunteers should benefit humanity in other times as well.

And thus, the League of Red Cross Societies was born, on the 5th of May 1919. There were five founding Red Cross Societies – those of the United States of America, Italy, Japan, France, and the United Kingdom. By the end of that year, the League had 30 members.

The League changed its name to the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies – the IFRC – in 1991. We now have 192 member National Societies, with more in formation.

The core of the idea has stayed the same while the scope of the IFRC network has grown massively, in reach and in impact.

In 2020, 14.9 million Red Cross and Red Crescent volunteers reached more than 688 million people with disaster and other emergency response work; some 306 million with health activities, and 125 million with clean water and sanitation assistance.

These are impressive figures, but the scale of the humanitarian needs continues to grow every year. Right now, countless people across the world need urgent support.

The conflict in Ukraine and the stress placed on its neighbouring countries is just one example. The lingering physical, social and economic damages inflicted by the global COVID-19 pandemic is another. Alongside these disasters is the ever-present, and worsening, threat of climate change.

With challenges like these, can a simple idea – like the one that led in 1919 to what is now known as the IFRC – still help to heal the world? I believe it can – and will. We know what works, and we’ve been proving it for more than a century.

It’s one human being reaching out to support another human being in crisis, at the community level, where it is always needed the most.

It’s ensuring that local volunteers and local organizations have the resources, training and as much (or as little) international support as they need to respond to disasters and crises. It’s making sure their voices are heard, and their interests represented, on the international stage.

And it is working to bring that support to the most marginalized communities and individuals, no matter where they are, and without any discrimination as to who they are.

It is – put simply – kindness.

I first joined my National Society, the Nepal Red Cross, as a volunteer more than three decades ago. I was trusted – and therefore able to meet and support the people in greatest need – because I was part of their community, I spoke their language, and I understood their concerns. And the key to understanding what people needed was kindness.

Over the years, the IFRC has evolved alongside the communities we support. We have adapted our ways of working, expanded our expertise as different vulnerabilities and stressors emerge, and have been agile enough to pioneer and then mainstream new approaches to humanitarian support.

We have led on the development and widespread acceptance of cash assistance as the most effective and most respectful way to support people in need. After all, people who have lost everything in a disaster or conflict should not have to lose their dignity as well.

And we are driving change in how disaster risks are managed and reduced through anticipatory action, where local communities are supported to reduce their risks, and immediate funding can be triggered once scientifically-measured thresholds are reached.

None of this work would be possible without the kindness of our 14.9 million Red Cross and Red Crescent community-based volunteers.

On World Red Cross and Red Crescent Day, 8th May, we will encourage people around the world to believe in the power of kindness and #BeHumanKIND.

The world is still bleeding. It still needs help. But there are nearly 15 million reasons to believe in kindness, and to have hope.

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If you'd like to read more about the history of the IFRC, visit our history and archives page.

And check out the hashtag #BeHumanKIND across all social media channels this week to see how our National Societies are celebrating World Red Cross and Red Crescent Day.